Luxemburgensia (6): Immigrants on the Increase

It’s got nothing to do with Malta. At least on the face of it. Most immigrant workers do not get here on a boat and do not end up in a quickly assembled camp waiting for a decision on their destiny. Most immigrant workers get to Luxembourg by plane or train and are armed with curriculum vitae or with the confirmation that they have found a new job. They will rent an exorbitantly expensive (ridiculously overvalued) flat, they will spend money in bars, restaurants and clubs and on weekends they will try to find something to do at the theatre or at the two bowling centres available. They will buy a car, pay road tax, pay expensive insurance policies and refill on cheap petrol (compared to countries surrounding Luxembourg). When they travel they will probably use Ryanair (from Germany) and work out impossible connections to their homeland because nobody here is bothered about keeping a good link elsewhere and when there is a link the airport tax is so incredibly prohibitive that a fourty minute flight to Turin costs around €700 euros.

But that is Luxembourg. It lives off its foreign workers but cannot be arsed to do much about their quality of life while they are here. At least for now. Today another article appears in L’essentiel highlighting the importance of the immigrant worker to the Luxembourg economy – and why Luxembourg needs to be more welcoming.

Le Luxembourg plus accueillant
En tout, 37 624 personnes détenaient l’autorisation de résider sur le territoire luxembourgeois en 2007, 20% de plus que l’année précédente.

De leur côté, les arrêtés de refus ont augmenté de 5,81% seulement, puisque 291 personnes se sont vu refuser l’entrée sur le sol luxembourgeois en 2007, contre 275 en 2006. Concernant les permis de travail, près de 94% des demandes ont été satisfaites, soit un total de 5611 permis accordés, 1 500 de plus que l’année précédente.

Pour Serge Kollwelter, président de l’Association de soutien aux travailleurs étrangers (ASTI), le Luxembourg est «un pays qui ne peut vivre ni survivre sans apport étranger». Toutefois, il juge la législation inadaptée. «Si le pays a besoin de têtes et de bras, il faut adapter les lois sur l’immigration à aujourd’hui, alors qu’elles datent de 1972».

Les demandeurs d’asile ont été eux moins nombreux l’année dernière, puisque 426 personnes (contre 523 en 2006) ont tenté de fuir vers le Luxembourg, dont 325 étaient issues de pays européens. Seuls 167 de ces demandeurs ont obtenu l’asile dans le pays. Par ailleurs, 225 expulsions ont été effectuées en 2007, 35% de moins qu’en 2006. Concernant ces dernières, le ministre de l’Immigration, Nicolas Schmit, a affirmé sa volonté de développer des centres de rétention et de continuer à expulser les contrevenants via des vols réguliers.

* Image: Luxembourg in Europe. The sun drawn in the middle of Luxembourg must be some geographer’s idea of a sick joke.

Advertisements

One response to “Luxemburgensia (6): Immigrants on the Increase

  1. le Luxembourg est «un pays qui ne peut vivre ni survivre sans apport étranger». Toutefois, il juge la législation inadaptée. «Si le pays a besoin de têtes et de bras, il faut adapter les lois sur l’immigration à aujourd’hui, alors qu’elles datent de 1972

    Immigration laws of 1972?!

    Very interesting. Could it be that they want to follow the successful Canadian example?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s